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An inability to remain upright inside the penalty area

Posted: Tue Jun 27, 2017 10:37 am
by Snuff
I am currently working on a project which requires long hours reading 1950s match reports.

This morning, reading the report of the Rangers v Queen's Park league game, at Ibrox, on 23 February, 1957, I noted that Rangers rescued a point, via a 3-3 draw, when Johnny Hubbard converted a 70th minute penalty, awarded, in spite of lengthy protests from the Queen's Park players, after youthful Rangers winger David Wilson - playing only his second first-team game - was adjudged to have been brought down inside the Spiders' penalty area.

Can I suggest this was the first sighting of the "Davie Dive", which would win Rangers so-many penalties over the next decade or more? Or am I being unfair?

Earlier in that campaign, with Rangers having a lengthy injury list, their home game against Airdrie was called-off on the Saturday morning, after match referee Willie Syme considered the Ibrox pitch to be "dangerous". It was the only senior game in the UK not to be played that day. Willie Syme?????

Re: An inability to remain upright inside the penalty area

Posted: Tue Jun 27, 2017 8:06 pm
by LEATHERSTOCKING
I seem to recall a Monday morning Bud Neil cartoon from the Daily Depress which included a box of Wilson being "tripped" near the halfway line & landing on his nose in the penalty area & another of said Wilson "...performing the twist in midair & upside down..." in the same postcode as `Well`s Willie McSeveney. Contemporarily notorious.

Re: An inability to remain upright inside the penalty area

Posted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 11:31 am
by Snuff
Forrest, if we take my discovery of the first "Davie Dive" as marking a seminal moment in football - the first alleged case of "simulation". Isn't it good to know - yet again in football landmarks, Queen's Park were involve.

Re: An inability to remain upright inside the penalty area

Posted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 6:35 pm
by LEATHERSTOCKING
Queen`s record against the FGR is, quite franky, abysmal - 8 league wins in nearly 90 meetings. 1956-57 could have been a landmark because the Spiders have never beaten Rangers home & away in a league season. On 23rd February, Bert Cromar(2) & George Herd had them 3-2 ahead @ Ibrox when Mr.Wilson did his dying swan act much to the chagrin of the visitors but almost worse followed on 22nd April @ Hampden. Eye rubbing spectators watched in disbelief when George Herd and a Hunter Devine hat-trick in a burst just before half time took Queen`s from a goal down to 4-1 ahead. The Gers pulled back a couple before the break then scored another three after lemons. Seven goals against what was generally considered the Iron Curtain defence for but a single point. Sigh.

Re: An inability to remain upright inside the penalty area

Posted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 9:01 pm
by LEATHERSTOCKING
FGR incidentally doesn`t have a rude connotation - it`s based on an old football annual which referred to the Ibrox lads as the FAMOUS GLASGOW RANGERS so there!

Re: An inability to remain upright inside the penalty area

Posted: Fri Jun 30, 2017 7:39 am
by Snuff
Leatherstocking wrote:
Seven goals against what was generally considered the Iron Curtain defence for but a single point. Sigh.


Reading through The Herald archive for that 1956-57 season, I noted the great Cyril Horne reflecting on the fact, where once Rangers had indeed relied on their Iron Curtain defence, that season they seemed set on out-scoring their opponents. Max Murray (ex Queen's Park of course) scored 41 goals, Billy Simpson scored 34 goals and Johnny Hubbard 26 goals (of which a mere 11 were penalties). In all, Rangers scored 143 goals in 54 first-team games, that equates to scoring 2.65 goals per game, while conceding 1.41gpg.

The figures for the first Treble season of 1948-49, when the Iron Curtain defence was coined were 2.15 gpg scored, 1.00gpg conceded. So, as so often, old Cyril was correct in his analysis.

Re: An inability to remain upright inside the penalty area

Posted: Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:38 pm
by LEATHERSTOCKING
So when QP got hold of the Rangers defence in 1956-547 they scored @ two and a half times the average and they STILL finished 13th(out of 18). What a team! Maxie Murray, like so many ex Spiders before him, didn`t shirk bulging the rigging behind his ex team`s netminder; he scored once in the 3-3 game & twice in the 4-6 one.