Thesis on the origins of Scottish football

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ScottishFA
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Thesis on the origins of Scottish football

Post by ScottishFA » Fri Apr 16, 2010 12:00 pm

Just stumbled across this Glasgow University thesis

McDowell, Matthew Lynn (2010) The origins, patronage and culture of
association football in the west of Scotland, c. 1865-1902.

http://theses.gla.ac.uk/1654/01/2009mcdowellphd.pdf

Looks interesting, although I haven't quite got through all 269 pages yet! But I see some well-kent names of this parish among the sources.

LEATHERSTOCKING
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Post by LEATHERSTOCKING » Fri Apr 16, 2010 12:32 pm

Yes, this looks well worth a read. Talking about the early days, there`s a letter in the Herald`s "Fans with Laptops" letter page @ the back of this morning`s sports section from a Hugh Barrow of Milngavie stating that in 1872 at the time of the International @ Hamilton Crescent,"...Queen`s Park was the only association club to draw from, but for the sake of appearance it was thought advisable to tack the name of a club to a few of the players. It was also intended to give one or two of the Glasgow Academicals a place in the lX, and although they turned out for practice, they did not allow themselves to be nominated, so it resulted that the whole team belonged to the Queen`s Park." This seems a bit confused to me - "advisable to tack the name of a club to a few of the players" & "lX". I have researched this period for a number of years and can find no evidence of Queen`s association with any of the other extant clubs in the Glasgow area(Glasgow Academicals, West of Scotland etc.) although I quite believe this happened because it`s unlikely that groups of young men all playing one sort of football or another did not have some kind of intercourse witness both the above mentioned clubs offering the use of their grounds for the 1872 game vs. England but by this time there was a sufficient difference between the dribblers` game and the handlers` for it to be a remote possibility for Glasgow Academical players to be asked to audition for the dribblers` maiden International. The Rugby men had already played a XX a side game vs. England. I dismiss nothing and would be very glad to hear from Mr.Barrow especially regarding his source.

ScottishFA
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Post by ScottishFA » Fri Apr 16, 2010 6:39 pm

Well, there was the potential for players to take part in football under both codes, and there is proof in the reports of two Scotland practice matches before the first international.

In the first, on Saturday 9 November 1872 at the Queen’s Park grounds, particular praise was given to Thomas Chalmers (Glasgow Academicals) who was “a capital goalkeeper, albeit the rules were new to him”. [Glasgow Herald, 11 November 1872]

The second trial was played at Burnbank, the ground of Glasgow Academicals, on the afternoon of Wednesday 20 November.

In between, the Herald listed 17 possible players, including Chalmers as well as William Cross (Merchistonians) and Henry Renny-Tailyour (Royal Engineers), who had all played for Scotland in one or both of the first two rugby internationals. However, when the team was announced on 25 November, it contained only QP members. It is clear from the Queen’s Park jubilee history that the match was considered to be a club initiative, and there was felt to be no responsibility to select ‘outsiders’ to bolster the strength of the team.

London-based Renny-Tailyour did of course go on to play for Scotland at association football in March 1873, the only person ever to have represented the country at both codes.

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